Sunday, December 3, 2017

December 3, 2017 | Pastor John Bayles | Prayers of St. Paul: To Fan the Flame of Your Calling - Part 2 | 2 Timothy 1:8-14



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December 3, 2017 | Pastor John Bayles | Prayers of St. Paul: To Fan the Flame of Your Calling - Part 2 | 2 Timothy 1:8-14

Prayers of St. Paul: To Fan the Flame of Your Calling | Part 2
2 Timothy 1:8-12

As before noted, Paul is writing to Timothy in Ephesus from a Roman prison. The tone from his first letter has changed dramatically. Paul has been in prison for up to 7 years. He has languished for this long time without any dramatic changes in his status. He has become weary and sick. There is trouble in Ephesus. Several of the elders and other preeminent persons have, in Paul’s absences begun to alter the message of the Gospel. This is not a hard thing to understand for the true nature of the Gospel is offensive. The Gospel’s message would be more acceptable if it were not for the need to admit ones utter sinfulness and the need for a Savior. This is highly true even for those who claim to be followers of he Way. From his own context of weakness, Paul draws from the calling he has received to stir up the calling in Timothy. What is the way to correction of error? Preach the Word with clarity and without compromise. Magnificent words for Timothy to hear and magnificent words for us today.

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Sunday, November 26, 2017

November 26, 2017 | Pastor John Bayles | Prayers of St. Paul: To Fan the Flame of Your Calling - Part 1 | 2 Timothy 1:1-7



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November 26, 2017 | Pastor John Bayles | Prayers of St. Paul: To Fan the Flame of Your Calling - Part 1 | 2 Timothy 1:1-7

This is the last letter that the Apostle Paul will ever write (that has survived). The letters to Titus and Philemon follow the writing of Paul’s first letter to Timothy. Paul is writing to Timothy in Ephesus from a Roman prison. The tone from his first letter has changed dramatically. Paul has been in prison for up to 7 years. He has languished for this long time without any dramatic changes in his status. He has become weary and sick. He recognizes that his time is nearly over on the earth. He is reflective yet determined to finish his life in a firm faith and has tried to affirm, encourage, correct and warn those whom he has left to the work in the churches he established. His last letter is to Timothy shows us the Paul’s – weary, but not broken. This is his last letter to a dear son. What will he say? What will he leave with him? Paul rises to the occasion as he draws not from his current condition, but from his calling. He presses upon Timothy the importance of what resources he already has at his disposal: most critically, his inner calling to the ministry. From here Paul will continue to impress upon his young son in the Lord the foundations of calling to ministry.

For the video version: click here.

Sunday, November 19, 2017

November 19, 2017 | Pastor John Bayles | Prayers of St. Paul: For a Calling that Overcomes Chains | Acts 26:29



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November 19, 2017 | Pastor John Bayles | Prayers of St. Paul: For a Calling that Overcomes Chains | Acts 26:29

Prayers of St. Paul: For a Calling that Overcomes Chains
Acts 26:29

What is calling to the ministry of the Word, the Gospel, the Message of Christ? How does it manifest itself in life? When I say, “I am a Christian,” what does that mean and, more importantly what does it call me to do? Today we will look into the last moments of the active ministry of the Apostle Paul. After an incredible journey which started in Macedonia with a small insight, a directive for the Lord, opposition to this instruction by every one who met him, some pleading “in the Holy Spirit” that he would abandon this calling, after being arrested, living under a death sentence, going under illegal scrutiny by a Jewish council and later, enduring a legal examination by kings and governors of Judea, being rescued by a call to be heard by Caesar, getting free passage to Rome (all expense paid), and finally placed in a pre-release supervised home under his own recognizance and awaiting the final verdict on his life. Here in chains he comes for another, perhaps a last opportunity to simply plead for freedom, receiving a verdict of innocent, sentenced to time served, the Apostle Paul makes his final appeal for makes his closing remarks. Today we will examine that last statement and perhaps recognize the we are under the same mandate for our lives.

For the video version: click here.

Sunday, November 12, 2017

November 12, 2017 | Pastor John Bayles | The Letters of St. Paul: Thanksgiving for Old Friends | Philippians 1:1-11



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November 12, 2017 | Pastor John Bayles | The Letters of St. Paul: Thanksgiving for Old Friends | Philippians 1:1-11

The Letters of St. Paul: Thanksgiving for Old Friends
Philippians 1:1-11

Philippi was named after the father of Alexander the Great, Philip of Macedon and later annexed by Rome. At the time of Paul's second missionary journey Philippi had been transformed into a leading colony of the empire. In Acts 16, Paul, Silas, Timothy (and Luke) came into contact with the people of Philippi on Paul’s second missionary journey. Having been restrained from going into Asia, the missionary band traveled north along the border of Galatia trough Mysia. From there they traveled south to Troas, took a ship and arrived at the port city of Neapolis. From there they took the nine mile walk to Philippi. They stayed in Philippi several days and each morning they went down to the riverside to pray. There the met Lydia and woman from Thatyira. Paul spoke to her and shared the Gospel. The Lord opened her heart and she became the first believer. Many converts came from Paul’s preaching and a large number formed a church in Philippi. They were energetic and generous toward Paul’s person and mission. At the time of this writing, perhaps 27 years later, from a prison cell in Rome, Paul wrote this letter to the Philippians. In the very first lines of the letter, he launches into a beautiful and meaningful prayer for the Philippian church and for us today.

For the video version: click here.

Sunday, November 5, 2017

November 05, 2017 | Pastor John Bayles | Prayers of St. Paul: For the Joy of the Gospel’s Power | 1 Thessalonians 1:1-3


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November 05, 2017 | Pastor John Bayles | Prayers of St. Paul: For the Joy of the Gospel’s Power | 1 Thessalonians 1:1-3

Prayers of St. Paul: For the Joy of the Gospel’s Power
1 Thessalonians 1:1-3

The letter to the Thessalonians is among the earliest writings of the Apostle Paul. Likely sent in the early 50's AD, there are some noteworthy historical distinctions in the letter, particularly the absence of Paul’s use of his apostolic title under which he often taught and corrected his audience. This is a unique relationship. Noteworthy is J.B. Phillip’s title for his translation of 1st & 2nd Thessalonians: A Letter to Young Churches. Paul’s audience was the product of a day of teaching before he was whisked from their city in the middle of the night. Paul also knew that though the converts in Thessalonica were filled with thanks and joy for their new birth in Christ, they were also discovering that their witness was bringing resistance, persecution and suffering. In these three verses and in the presence of suffering, Paul outlines a summary of the whole of the Christian life.

For the video version: click here.

Sunday, October 29, 2017

October 29, 2017 | Pastor John Bayles | Reformation Sunday | The Life of Theodore Beza



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October 29, 2017 | Pastor John Bayles | Reformation Sunday | The Life of Theodore Beza

October 29, 2017
Reformation Sunday
The Life of Theodore Beza

Positioned on the Reformation wall in Geneva, Switzerland to the right side of his mentor, John Calvin, is the marble relief of Theodore Beza. Beza was the protegee of Calvin for the majority of his life and served at Calvin’s side as a teacher, a trusted confidant and remarkably, as a gifted apologist and negotiator. The statement, “We stand on the shoulders of giants” is particularly true of Theodore Beza. Today, in celebration of Reformation Sunday, we will review the life and contributions of this second-generation Father of the French Protestant Reformation.

For the video version: click here.

Tuesday, October 24, 2017

October 22, 2017 | Pastor Appreciation Sunday | Roger Melson | Jeremiah: The Prophet with a Burning Heart | Jeremiah 20:9


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October 22, 2017 | Pastor Appreciation Sunday | Roger Melson | Jeremiah: The Prophet with a Burning Heart | Jeremiah 20:9

Jeremiah: The Prophet with a Burning Heart
Jeremiah 20:9

One Sunday each year during the month of October, Twinbrook Community Church sets aside a Sunday to share its appreciation for our Pastor. This year Rev. Roger Melson, a longtime friend of Pastor Bayles, brought the keynote sermon. Today’s sermon highlights the life of the Prophet Jeremiah. Though he was perhaps the greatest prophet of Israel, he was also the least listened to by his audience. Over his forty-year ministry he had zero converts. Though he experienced calamity and persecution experimentally, he was sustained by a burning heart for the message of righteousness God had planted in his life.

For the video version: click here.

                                                  Roger and Marsha Melson

Monday, October 16, 2017

October 15, 2017 | Pastor John Bayles | Prayers of St. Paul: Living a Life Worthy of the Calling | 2 Thessalonians 1:1-12



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October 15, 2017  | Pastor John Bayles | Prayers of St. Paul: Living a Life Worthy of the Calling | 2 Thessalonians 1:1-12

Prayers of St. Paul: Living a Life Worthy of the Calling
2 Thessalonians 1:1-12

The historical context of this letter is Acts 17: Paul’s second missionary Journey; the inclusion of the author, Luke (see the sudden use of the personal pronoun “we” in Act.16, showing the moment Luke joined the team in Macedonia. The four of them visited Philippi and then set out south-west toward Thessalonica. There a huge disturbance started when Paul’s message that Jesus was the Christ enraged some Jews in the synagogue and over the course of a few days left the city at night in fear of being killed. He traveled on to Berea, then Athens and finally Corinth. From Athens Paul sent Timothy back to Thessalonica to find out if his Gospel message had born fruit. Timothy found Paul and Silas (and Luke) in Corinth where he wrote the first letter to the Thessalonians. Because they stayed in Corinth eighteen months, Paul later sent a second letter to Thessalonica specifically explaining why God allows persecution, instructing them that the appearing of Christ would come after the great rebellion Christ declared in Matthew 24; and the coming of the lawless one, the Antichrist; and finally, that they must guard against being idle in the presence of the task of fulfilling Christ command to go into all the world. In this text, the Apostle Paul not only instructs the Thessalonians, but prays for them that they will be a clear reflection not of what they are believing or doing for God, but that they may be a clear reflection of who God is and what he has done for them thorough Christ.

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October 8, 2017 | Pastor John Bayles | Prayers of St. Paul: For the Israel of God | Romans 10:1-13



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October 8, 2017 | Pastor John Bayles | Prayers of St. Paul: For the Israel of God | Romans 10:1-13

Prayers of St. Paul: For the Israel of God
Romans 10:1-13

The prayer we will look at today is produced by a lifestyle left behind by the Apostle Paul. That life was once his passion; that life was once his obsession; that life was once his hard taskmaster. Paul is not longing to return to a life of a Pharisee, nor the broader life of Judaism. His longing is for those within these circles who are his family, his kin, yet now foreigners to him and faith in Jesus Christ. Though Paul seems to reminisce about the pleasure of their companionship, he does not drift too far from the realization that they are in two separate worlds and captivated by two covenants. From this new covenant context, Paul prays that his former brethren might be turned from turn their zeal for hypocritical righteousness – “I’m better than you,” to the righteousness of God provided by the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ. Within this prayer is a model for us to follow. May the great Father of Hosts draw as only He can, the hearts of those for whom we too long to come into His marvelous Kingdom light.

For the video version: click here.

Sunday, October 1, 2017

October 1, 2017 | Pastor John Bayles | Prayers of St. Paul: Praise God for His Work of Redemption |




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October 1, 2017  | Pastor John Bayles | Prayers of St. Paul: Praise God for His Work of Redemption | Romans 11:33-36

Prayers of St. Paul: Praise God for His Work of Redemption
Romans 11:33-36

Throughout the Epistle to the Romans, Paul has spent eleven chapters outlining, illustrating, and defending God's plan of salvation. God has closed a door: it is impossible for any person to please God, have a whole relationship with God or communion with God on the basis of his/her personal righteousness as he proclaimed – "There is none righteous, no not one" (Rom.3:23). God has opened a door: it is possible for a person to please God, have a whole relationship with God, and communion with God through the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ – "3 For what the law was powerless to do in that it was weakened by the sinful nature, God did by sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful man to be a sin offering. And so he condemned sin in sinful man, 4 in order that the righteous requirements of the law might be fully met in us, who do not live according to the sinful nature but according to the Spirit" (Rom.8:3,4). God has ended an Old Covenent relationship: The Jews, though historically God's people, cannot come into a relationship with God by keeping the law, even though they are precious to Him and have a historical relationship to Him, they are hopelessly lost and under God's wrath. Gentiles cannot come into a relationship with God by becoming Jews or keeping the law. They are also hopelessly lost and under God's wrath. God has initiated a New Covenant relationship: Through Christ's atoning death and victorious resurrection, both Jews and Gentiles can come into a righteous relationship to God, but only through belief in the saving work of Christ's death, confessing Him as Lord and expressing belief in His resurrection from the dead. All of these mercies were accomplished before we were even aware that they existed: “1As for you, you were dead in your transgressions and sins, 2 in which you used to live when you followed the ways of this world and of the ruler of the kingdom of the air, the spirit who is now at work in those who are disobedient” (Rom.2:1-3). This act of grace took place so that God alone might receive the glory for His kindness toward us. Only by grace can we enter. Only through the door, Jesus Christ. Paul now turns to offer a prayer of glorious thanks and praise to God for His work of redemption.

For the video version: click here.